Yosemite
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Yosemite

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Created by volcanoes and sculpted by glaciers, Yosemite National Park plays host to some of the most spectacular geological and biological features on Earth! From El Capitan, a popular rock climbing destination, to the easily-recognizable Half Dome, photo opportunities abound for even the most casual visitor. In popular culture, Yosemite is famous for its bears. But, Yosemite is also home to three groves of ancient giant sequoias, several magnificent waterfalls, and a handful of endangered species, such as the Sierra Nevada Bighorn. Whether you come to play or just plan on relaxing, one thing is for sure: You will leave a little piece of your heart in Yosemite National Park.

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Yosemite

  • Our tips for Yosemite

    Our tips for Yosemite
    • Patron of the YARTS. Even if you have your own wheels during your Yosemite tour, you may wish to use the convenient Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System. It’s what to do in Yosemite!
    • Early Bird Special. The restaurants in Yosemite close early. Check their opening hours ahead of time and try to arrive an hour before close at the latest. Don’t go hungry!
    • Golden Hour. The most popular locations within Yosemite are most beautiful just after sunrise and before sunset. It helps that these locations are less busy during these times as well!
  • Good to know

    Good to know
    Best Time To Visit The Yosemite National Park is open 365 days a year, regardless of weather conditions. That said, the best time to visit the Yosemite is, without question, during the summer. Many popular campgrounds and attractions are seasonal and operate for a short time only. If you wish to avoid the crowds, late spring and early fall are also nice. But, you may run into a little rain; so, pack accordingly. Temperatures reach below freezing from November through April and the park is far less busy, bringing in only 23% of the average annual visitors during this half of the year.
    Getting There Yosemite National Park is about 1,200 square miles in size and there isn’t a convenient address to input into your GPS. Still, most visitors drive to Yosemite. From the south, you take the I-5 north to Highway 99 north to Highway 41 north into Yosemite National Park. From the north, you take Highway 99 south to Highway 120 east to Highway 140 east into Yosemite. Amtrak provides a combination of trains and buses to get to Yosemite. Or, you can take a Greyhound bus into the city of Merced and complete your journey using the Yosemite Area Regional Transportation Systems (YARTS).
    Money Saving Tips Strapped for cash? No problem! You can save a fair amount of money during your Yosemite trip by planning ahead. Once you are within the park, you will find much higher gasoline prices. Fill up your tank before entry and you should have no problem getting in, getting around, and getting out without getting fleeced at the pump.
    Did you know? Act like a park ranger by spouting off these factoids about Yosemite.
    • The iconic hats worn by park rangers were originally fashioned by African-American Buffalo Soldiers. The soldiers found that they could better shed rain by pinching the top of their hats into what is now the easily recognizable “Montana Peak”.
    • Yosemite lost a bid to host the 1932 Winter Olympics. Could you imagine the destruction if the Olympics were held there nowadays?
    • On Independence Day, 1970, a riot broke out in Stoneman Meadow. For years, several hundred hippies had been muscling in on the bears’ share of tourist leftovers. Tear gas and batons left several injured and 138 flower children were arrested.
    • From the 1870’s until 1968, the Waterfall of Fire was a popular attraction at Yosemite. The owner of a hotel on Glacier Point would put out his nightly campfire by kicking the embers over a cliff. He was actually paid to continue the tradition until rangers realized how reckless it was and put a stop to it.

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