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Boston North End Walking Tour

US$ 70.00 Price per person from View price guide

Key facts

Where: Boston , U.S.A. Duration: 3 hours

Highlights

  • Explore the oldest district of Boston
  • Visit the scene of the famous ride of American patriot Paul Revere
  • Discover aspects of Boston that other visitors miss
  • The perfect tour for history buffs
  • Exclusive tour with plenty of personal attention

Overview

Discover Boston’s eventful past on a fascinating tour of the oldest part of the city, led by a local historian.

Since its founding in 1630, Boston has embodied many of the historical themes that have shaped America including commerce, political revolution, social innovation, and waves of immigration that formed the backbone of this northern capital.

Of all the city's neighborhoods none symbolizes and captures the essence of Boston more than its North End, a maze of winding colonial-era streets and the backdrop to some of the most significant moments in American history.

The North End is a rich tapestry of history, with fragments of different centuries all woven together. During a three-hour walking seminar with a local historian you will explore North End's back alleys and side streets, painting a portrait of Boston's evolution from the 17th to the 21st century.

This small group tour has a maximum of six participants so you will have plenty of chance to interact with your expert guide.

Itinerary

For your Boston North End Walking Tour, you should make your way to the front of the bronze statue of Mayor James Curley, located in a small "pocket" park between Congress and Union Streets, just off North Street, about half a block from Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market. Here your local historian guide will be waiting for you.

With your expert guide, you will set off to explore the city’s oldest residential community – North End – where people have lived continuously since the 1630s.

The walk begins near the Blackstone Block , a small network of alleyways and structures dating back to the colonial era. John Hancock lived here, and several of the buildings still stand relatively unaltered from the 18th century. Using the streets themselves as visual clues you’ll consider the topographical advantages of the North End – nearly separated from the mainland by inlets and swamps– for the early settlers in Boston. Your route takes you through Haymarket, one of the city's longest standing outdoor markets and a place where Northenders still buy their groceries.

Tracing a path along streets that still bear the names of important Bostonians or long vanished features you’ll discuss the major developments of the North End as it evolved into one of the busiest shipping ports on the Atlantic seaboard during the colonial era and became America's gateway to Europe.

Your guide will use some of the old storefronts and pubs to discuss the rise of a longshoreman class and shipping industry and paint a portrait of the ethnic and racial changes the North End witnessed as freed slaves and Portuguese whalers settled in the district, followed by Jews, Irish, and eventually Italians.

Of course, the neighborhood's importance is etched on our collective memory through the famous ride of Paul Revere on the eve of the American Revolution, and we will look deeply into how the character of this corner of Boston informed and influenced the radicalism of those events, stopping along the way at such important 18th century monuments as Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church.

Your guide will also talk about more recent history and its effects on the North End.For example, you will learn about the impact of the Industrial Revolution and how Boston declined as New York overtook it in shipping and the factories of the North End moved to the suburbs and then farther afield. Old warehouses, wharves, and tenements are now converted into cafes, restaurants, and condominiums, often stitched delicately into the architecture and context of the city's history.

Depending on time and how the group discussion unfolds you may end the walk down at the waterfront where a park commemorates the Italian immigrants who've defined the North End in the last hundred years. With Boston harbor behind you, you’ll look back at the North End with a unique sense of its role in Boston and American history.

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Activity Schedule

When does it run?

Mondays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays

Duration

3 hours

Start time

Start time:10:00am

Meeting point

Your guide will be waiting at the front of the bronze statue of Mayor James Curley, which is located in a small "pocket" park situated between Congress and Union Streets, just off North Street, about half a block from Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market.
Please reach the meeting point 15 minutes earlier.

Ending point

The tour ends in North End, often at Boston Harbor, but may vary according to the interests of the group

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Inclusions

  • English-speaking local historian guide

Exclusions

  • Hotel pick-up and drop-off
  • Food and beverages

Do/Dont's

Dress for the weather and wear comfortable shoes for walking. Remember to bring a camera!

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Please note

Please call the activity operator at least 24 hours prior to start of the tour for reconfirming departure details.

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Additional info

  • The confirmation voucher includes the local activity operator’s contact details and local telephone numbers at the destination. They will happily answer any logistical questions you may have.
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Cancellation policy

See the Cancellation policy for this product

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  • Child age

  • Children are not allowed
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